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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
. well, matt, as you know, the high octane british prime minister, david cameron, arrived for his first u.s. visit since taking office in early may. and we had a chance to interview him. cameron and obama, both in their 40s, both with young children. but cameron is a conservative, and on this day, we learned bp is selling $7 billion in assets to another oil company, the apache corporation, to generate cash for the costs of the oil spill. cameron had been worried that unrelenting u.s. pressure on the company could affect the stockholders on both sides of the ocean. are you as angry about what happened in the gulf as americans are? >> yes, i was very angry about it because anyone who cares about the environment, when you see those pictures of oil pouring out of an underground well and doing so much environmental damage, doing damage to wildlife, to beaches, that makes you angry, that makes you angry. i want bp to sort it out. i do think it's in britain's interest and also america's interest, and the world's interest, that bp remains a strong and stable company, not only so it is able to make
show you how they're keeping the power flowing. >>> spies on the move. the u.s. and russia swapping secret agents. >>> jindal on a tear. bobby jindal rips into federal experts. who is right now about what he wants? we double check. >>> and ringo at 70. and we know his secret birthday wish. >>> good evening. it is the fourth day now of 100 degree temperatures, and the heat is taking its toll. we've seen water mains bursting. here's one. and the roads are buckling from the heat. up and down the east coast, big cities bake for another day. and those people who have to direct the power grids are trying something heroic to avoid blackouts. we're going to show you their decisions, as sharyn alfonsi starts us off in a truly steamy new york. >> reporter: diane, surprisingly, there are no widespread outages tonight. but utility companies tell us the worst problems may be ahead. so, cities around the country are taking extreme measures. they struggled to make their way out of a steamy subway station. the escalators shut off to conserve power. extreme measures to cut down on extreme demand for
>>> tonight on "world news," spy for a spy. at this hour, the spies are on the move as the u.s. and russia pull off a cloak and dagger swap. >>> mamma grizzlies. sarah palin rolls out a challenge, saying conservative mothers are on the march. >>> big break. did one slice of pizza solve the case of a serial killer? >>> return to haiti. six months after the earthquake, is there medicine, food? what has changed? >>> and, big choice. the king of basketball decides his future, and we'll show you why his body is in a league all its own. >>> good evening. we are watching an international drama unfold at warp speed tonight. the spy story between the u.s. and russia, who are trading secret air gents tonight. it's a deal, as you know, straight out of a novel. those ten russians accused of gathering secrets for a decade here in the u.s. pled guilty this afternoon, and tonight, head back to moscow. and chief investigative correspondent brian ross is here, following the details. >> reporter: diane, tonight, prison cells in the u.s. and russia are being emptied out as more than a dozen accus
. andrea canning, abc news, new york. >>> and now, that u.s.-russian spy swap, the biggest since the cold war, is a done deal tonight in the end, ten spies were flown out of new york to vienna and swapped for four russians. the planes, one russiaen, one, parked side by side. so, how is this playing in the headlines in moscow? abc's alex marquardt lives and reports in russia for us. >> reporter: anna chapman and her family are staying in the countryside. tomorrow, like all ten, figuring out what's next. all of their as sets have been seized by the u.s. government. so, they will rely on russia and family to get a new start. one of the ten has been offered an apartment and $2,000 a month for life. it's unclear if that's what everyone will get. so, how did it all play here? this is today's newspaper. below the fold, the heldline reads "chanexchange of the prisoners." not that big of a story here. russians actually found it pretty funny how big a deal americans made out of it. diane? >> all right, alex, thanks to you. didn't play that big there. >>> and all eyes are under iran tonight, where a
in the u.s. is it global warming? >>> and, want to win? a sharp shooter takes on a carnival game at the state fair. >>> good evening. arizona's immigration law is on hold. the protests are not. emboldened by a judge's rebuke of that law yesterday, hundreds of opponents of the crackdown took to the streets today. but the state's unyielding governor stood by the law and filed an appeal. barbara pinto is in phoenix tonight. she's been there all day, in the middle of the stormy showdown. >> reporter: protestors descended on phoenix, despite a judge's ruling to delay enforcement of most of the state's new crackdown on illegal immigrants. demonstrations started at dawn, hundreds of protesters, dozens of arrests, tempering flaring. tensions are running high outside this jail, where protesters have gathered and it's turned into a standoff, police trying to push their way out of the building. demonstrations were loud, disruptive, but mostly peaceful. >> joe arpaio has picked the easy targets, the day laborers. let's go after the real criminals and stop wasting our money. >> reporter: this
last week, hillary clinton called pakistan a partner. the u.s. gives more than $1 billion annually to pakistan to help fight terrorism. but there are 180 dispatches here, some offering strong details that pakistan's military intelligence agency, the isi, is helping the afghan insurgency attack american troops. in another one, an official from the cia's counterterrorism center says two religious schools or madrassas near peshawar, pakistan, are providing 95% of suicide attackers. the cia adds this chilling detail -- every month, quote, the former chief of isi, general hamid gul, is visiting one of the madrassas. there is also horrifying detail about civilian deaths in 2007. five ground-launched american rockets destroy a compound where it is believed a senior al qaeda commander is staying. the army delta force arrives to find seven children killed by the rockets and no al qaeda commander. there is a strong warning to anyone reading the secret report not to share the information with anyone outside the united states. saying the rocket strike must be kept protected. and one of the mor
. a closer review of the papers show they contain the names of afghans who worked as u.s. sources, providing sensitive information to help. people whose lives may now be on the line, and here's martha raddatz. >> reporter: we are blurring the names of the informants, but al qaeda and the taliban have already been able to see them on the wikileaks website. names of ordinary afghans who have risked their lives to help american forces and now could very well lose their lives. >> it is entirely possible within days, weeks, people will be killed as a result of this kind of an exposure. >> reporter: there are numerous examples. the identity of a district chief of a village we won't name informed coalition forces that the taliban are planning to attack district offices soon. this one names a man who is trying to defect from the taliban, and turned over a letter about taliban plans for attack. and another one, the name of a local man who had gone to the u.s. military to tell them the name of a taliban leader responsible in a recent attack by an estimated 100-plus taliban fighters in response to u.s.
is a serious health problem in the u.s. and worldwide. unfortunately, we have very few treatments that are effective and safe. >> reporter: in preliminary results, qnexa was shown to reduce weight by 12%. it combines a seizure and migraine medication with phentermine. and if phentermine sounds familiar, you're right. it was one-half of the phen in the recalled diet drug fen-phen. though phentermine was not implicated in the serious side effects including heart valve failure that led the fda to pull fen-phen in 1997, the fda will certainly be focused not just on whether the drug works, but on whether it is safe. >> if someone is promising something so powerful, it probably has other consequences. >> reporter: surgery is still the treatment with the most clear results for obesity, but it isn't without risks. and ultimately, experts caution, any solution promised by pill or scalpel. >> drugs cannot replace diet and exercise. >> reporter: documents will be posted to the fda site at 6:00 a.m. tomorrow morning. giving us a first look at the direction the fda may be heading. diet pills a
of the 1989 lockerbie bombing. today, four u.s. senators called on the british government to investigate claims the firm pushed for abdelbaset al-megrahi's release last year al in exchain for an oil exploration deal in libya worth more than $1 billion. >> it's almost too disgusting to fathom. >> reporter: tonight, a bp spokesman told abc news the company did express concern to the british government about quote slow progress on a prison er transfer agreement with libya, aware this could have a negative impact on bp's exploration agreement. however, bp says it never mentioned megrahi specifically and was not involved in any discussions about his release. 26 libyans were in british prisons at the time of the agreement, though it was megrahi who libya wanted free. for relatives of victims of the lockerbie bombing, the allegation sparked immediate outrage. >> i find it absolutely shocking and horrifying that this could absolutely upturn an entire justice system. >> reporter: the british government in power at the time of the bp deal has alternated between insisting it was motivated pure ly b
been wiped out. orter: the tuthe u.s. auto industry turnaround is the job losses? he job losses? more than 330,000 in 2008, have topped. and the industry is actually hiring new workers. 55,000 over the past year. >> kept the doors open, kept the heghts on. >> we're hoping we're on a hopingk. >> reporter: the president mocked republicans who loudly epublicans whoilout and predicted it would not work. >> they don't like admitting >> n when i do the right thing. but they might have had to admit it. want allt all of you to know, i will bet on the american worker ny day of the week. >> reporter: one of the biggest critics was republican richard shelby. today, he still thinks the out was a s a mistake. >> the american taxpayers are still on the hook, will always be on the hook. still on the h a lot of this money will never this money w >> reporter: he's actually right about that. the bush administration gave the bu n, nothan $25 billion, no strings attached, to bailout gm and chrysler. and and nobody expects that money to torepaid. st they have already started repaying some of the $60 billi
are right here in the u.s.? >> about 3,000. >> reporter: and why so many b jobs overseas? >> that's where the need -- excuse me, that's where the customer is. >> reporter: a third of the new jobs here in the u.s. economists told me there's only so far you can push the work force, making their work harder, longer hours, to make the companies leaner and meaner. they said to keep the profits up, they're going to have to spend all the billions in profits on the sidelines in hiring new workers. >> right now, productivity is keeping it going. >> reporter: it is. all-tile high. >> all right, thank you, david. >>> and we turn now to afghanistan, because there was tough news out of afghanistan tonight. three more american troops have died in the past 24 hours, bringing the total in july to 66. and that is the highest of any month since the war began almost nine years ago. afghanistan was one of the topics house speaker nancy pelosi tackled in a wide-ranging interview with abc's christiane amanpour, who makes her debut as host of "this week." welcome aboard. tell us what the speaker said. >> report
kofman, thank you. >>> general david petraeus is now in command of u.s. forces. he has told the troops there we are in this to win. tonight, a rare window into what these soldiers face every day. the story of a 25-year-old corporal who bravely put down his own weapon to earn the trust of an entire village, one afghan at a time. >> reporter: in this village, marines can do something they can't do anywhere else. >> it didn't happen overnight. it definitely took a lot of trust for them to see that we have enough trust in them to drop our gear and set our weapons against the wall. >> reporter: the trust after villagers cut a deal with marines. let us take care of our own security and you'll have no worries. >> i never thought i would be doing this. this is the type of stuff i used to see on tv, watching the military channel. >> reporter: 25-year-old colin blondset is in the program, basically a neighborhood watch with guns. just yesterday, the taliban were shooting at us, he says. we answered them with bullets. you came in here four months ago, you were shooting at these people and they we
jobs? we learned today that the u.s. lost jobs for the first time this year, breaking a five-month streak. employers cutting 125,000 people from the payroms in june. and there are new questions about whether the recovery has hit a wall. and so we asked bianna golodryga to look at the numbers. >> reporter: this is what economist s predicted. there was something else today, the unemployment rate inching ever so slightly down. but even there, economists are cautious. on the surface, that slight drop in the unemployment rate, down to 9.5%, seems hopeful. but beneath the surface, a very different reality. >> don't take any hope from the drop in unemployment. people are just very discourageded, and they are so discouraged they just stop looking. when you stop looking, you're no longer counted. >> reporter: and more concerning is the amount of time that americans are sitting out of the work force. nearly 7 million have been out of work for six months or longer. there was fred sherod the 52 account manager we just met this week. fred has been looking for work for a year and a half no
. >>> now, an investigative report on u.s. intelligence after 9/11 is causing a stir tonight. "the washington post" spent two years charting the giant sprawl, the increase of agencies, now involved in increased intelligence. "the post" says there are now more than 1,200 government organizes, almost 2,000 private company, involved in collecting intelligence. a huge number of people, 854,000, have access to the most sensitive information, top secret security clearance. a lot of people are questioning whether the growth was effective or out of control. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton arrived in afghanistan today for an international conference on the war and rebuilding that country. as two more american troops died over the weekend. 42 so far in july. which means this may be another of the deadliest months ever for americans. and that brings us to one mother and a few seconds of footage on abc news. she knew that her son had died in afghanistan. she knew nothing about his last moments until then. she looked up and realized what only a mother could. here's martha raddatz. >> whe
praised each other, talked about the special u.s.-israel relationship. a long hand shake. and president obama escorted gnat ya hue to his limousinlimo. it was a core owe grafed farewell where the president said to him, be well, shook his hand, waved good-bye. it was more demonstrative bwe have your. >> did gnat yao hue change anythi anything? >> reporter: well, you know that moratorium that housing freeze they have in place expires in september, and today the president and the prime minister seemed to indicate that before it expires in september, there will be an announcement of direct peace talks between the israelis and the palestinians. one of the big issues has been, how much is israel willing to say up front, they will willing to give up in terms of territory and borders. there seems to have been some movement. we'll see. >> and that would be fast movement to do it before september. >> reporter: absolutely. >> thanks, jake. >>> and still ahead on "world news," something we can all do that really does change the risk from cancer. and the new idea that helps us make it happen. >>> th
of attacking a u.s. military base in afghanistan and providing al qaeda with details about new york's rail system. many, including chester, allegedly used the internet to contact red calls like anwar al awlaki, who has been tied to the ft. hood massacre. >> this is what we feared for a very long time, that finally the ideology of radical islam is effectively reaching into the united states, to disaffected people here. over the internet, and through other ways. >> reporter: authorities are in a race against time to find these domestic radicals before there's a successful attack here at home. pierre thomas, abc news, washington. >>> and still ahead on "world news," testing your dna. do those at-home tests really unlock the mysteries of disease? >>> the social networking revolution. why politics will never be the same. >>> perks of office. a former member of congress ditched this car. why you're paying the bill. what you did at this morning's meeting? that was pure poetry. stop it. hello? you spotted a million dollar accounting error that no one else noticed. that was pretty sweet. but you di
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)